Performance Management

Purpose: 

To set expectations that will support employee success and assist staff to perform at their highest potential, improve productivity, and resolve issues in a timely way. To improve morale and retain employees. To ensure legal performance management practices and avoid the high cost of litigation. To meet our mission of promoting and retaining employees who are aligned with Recover Care’s mission and guiding principles.

Regulation: N/A
Policy: 

Measurement:

  1. 100% of involuntary terminations have sufficient documentation to justify termination and termination has been reviewed and approved by Human Resources

Process:

  1. Identify the type of performance problem  that exists – When a performance issue arises, it is important to identify the specific performance gap. Most performance problems fall into one of the following categories:
    1. Execution:  The employee is not fully performing the essential functions of the job
    2. Conduct:   Employee behavior is not aligned with the organization's mission and values
    3. Work Rules:  Violation of organization’s established policies, procedures standards of practice and guidelines, e.g. attendance, OT, phone usage, clinical practice guidelines
    4. Legal: Problems that may result in liability issues for the organization such as safety and privacy violations.  
  2. Identify the performance gap – Employer must identify the performance gap and document. Keep it specific and simple – articulate very specifically the answer to these two questions (keep in mind – policies and procedures, employee handbook, job duties, performance evaluations):
    1. What does the company expect the employee to do?
    2. What is the employee actually doing
  3. Document the performance gap and determine specific corrective action steps required
    1. As a general practice, Recover Care will follow the following performance management progression below for repeat offenses of the same or similar performance problems. Depending on the severity of the performance gap, a supervisor reserves the right to move to a more serious step in the performance management process.
    2. A critical part of the performance management process is clear and explicit documentation of all corrective action steps. The steps below all require documentation via Performance Improvement Plan (PIP). All documentation should only include objective evidence of performance gap(s). This may include excerpts from the employee handbook, policies and procedures, 1:1 communication, emails, memos, prior PIPs, etc.
      • Step 1:  Verbal Warnings
        • Typically, the first offense of a performance gap in a company policy that does not put a client, the company or an employee at risk
        • Ex. Being on personal phone during a shift, not completing documentation in the client home, arriving late to a client home without notification to the office (and no adverse client result), calling off a shift less than four hours from shift start time
        • DOCUMENTATION – all verbal warnings must be documented in the employee personnel file via PIP, indicating verbal warning, and include clear and specific expectations for improved performance
      • Step 2:  Written Warnings
        • If an offense previously addressed in a verbal warning is repeated within the same 12-month period, the corrective action will move to a written warning
        • A performance gap in a company policy that puts a client, company, or employee at risk or defies professional role expectations
        • Ex. Medication Error (all medication errors resulting in missed medications must result in a written warning), pattern of not completing documentation in the home / timely, consistently tardy or absent from shifts, poor attitude / insubordination to manager and / or support staff
        • DOCUMENTATION – all written warnings must be documented in the employee personnel file via PIP, indicating written warning; if this is a follow up to a verbal PIP, documentation should be on the same PIP used in the prior corrective action step and include updated goals for employee to improve performance; manager should conduct a PIP conversation and attempt to obtain employee signature on PIP.
      • Step 3:  Suspension / Final Warning
        • If an offense previously addressed in a written warning is repeated again within the same 12-month period, the corrective action will move to a suspension / final warning
        • Any L3 incident situation requiring investigation. i.e. theft, abuse, falsification of documentation, inappropriate boundaries will trigger a Step 3 suspension
        • DOCUMENTATION – final warnings must be documented in the employee personnel file via PIP, indicating final warning; if this is a follow up to a written PIP, documentation should be on the same PIP used in the prior corrective action step and include updated goals for employee to improve performance; manager should attempt to obtain employee signature on PIP
      • Step 4:  Termination
        • If an offense previously addressed in a final warning / suspension is repeated again within the same 12-month period, the corrective action will move to termination, pending Human Resource Approval
        • There are some instances that may lead to immediate termination. i.e. No-call no-show, insubordination, client fraud and abuse, theft, new information re: criminal background
        • Prior to any involuntary termination, manager must alert Human Resources indicating:
          1. Why manager wants to terminate employment
          2. Brief review of prior corrective action taken
          3. Documentation of prior corrective action taken
          4. Intended date of termination
        • DOCUMENTATION – if this is a follow up to a suspension / final warning PIP, documentation should be on the same PIP used in the prior corrective action step; manager should attempt to obtain employee signature on PIP. If this is an immediate termination, documentation must be clearly and specifically documented, and recorded in Caregivers personnel file
  4. Meet with employee – once the manager has determined the corrective action step and documented the performance gap, the manager must meet with the employee to review the PIP. If the offense is grave enough, the manager reserves the right to take employee off the schedule until he / she meets with manager to develop of plan of improvement. 
    1. The intent of this meeting is to:
      • Define the performance gap and expectations
      • Help employee understand why this does not meet expectations and why it needs to be resolved
      • Develop a plan for improvement with clear goals (i.e. additional required training, expectations around attendance, etc.)
      • Establish an agreed upon timeline for employee to improve performance
      • Listen to the employee’s feedback and integrate into improvement plan as appropriate
      • Identify employee need for support to achieve expectations
      • Gain agreement from the employee to improve performance
      • Explain the consequences of failing to improve
      • Set deadline for demonstration of improvement
  5. Follow Up – The performance meeting is not the manager’s last step. The manager must:
    1. Record employee response
      • Complete documentation that the meeting occurred, including obtaining the employee’s signature and or documenting they would not sign
      • Place the documents in the employee file in Paychex
      • Provide the employee ongoing feedback on performance.  It is just as important as the meeting itself, for good or bad the employee should be kept informed on how they are doing



Developing a Good Performance Improvement Plan (PIP)

  1. A good performance improvement plan will describe, in detail, how the employee will improve performance and move to success. It will include specific performance gaps, and goals to demonstrate how to improve performance.
    • Documenting specific performance gaps:
      • Whenever possible, insert documented company policy and handbook expectations into the performance improvement plan
      • Gives clear examples where performance gap is evident; include dates, emails, texts, and documented evidence of performance gap
    • Documenting specific goals:
      • Set clear and measurable goals and objectives; goals should not be subjective
      • Provide sufficient Resources – Don’t assume that employee knows what to do to improve performance
      • Offer appropriate training and support
      • Indicate timeline for effecting change
        • If the intent is to monitor the employee during a period of time, that must be indicated ie. “Failure to meet any of the agreed upon goals before the indicated follow-up date, will result in disciplinary action up to and including termination.”
      • Explain consequences of continued poor performance
    • Additional Keys to Success in Developing PIPs:
      • PIPs should be free of emotion and subjective material
      • Explain why the task is important to the organization, aligning with organization's Mission and Core Values
      • Explain why the task is important to the employee (What’s in it for me?)
      • Set boundaries – managers must be careful not to make too many accommodations to employee performance. It is still necessary for the employee to learn how to do the job or task independently
        **See example Performance Improvement Plan below below


 

Date of PIP Meeting: 7/26/19

☐ Verbal

☒ Written

Performance Area

Improvement Goal / Action

Follow-up date

Comments

Failure to complete client medication documentation on 7/18/19, 7/19/19, and 7/23/19. Per Recover Care policy, “Each medication administered by Recover Care staff must be documented in the client's record on the Medication Administration Record (MAR).”

  • Employee will achieve 100% complete documentation by the end of each scheduled shift between now and follow-up date.
  • If employee is unable to complete documentation in the home, she will call her manager immediately to explain the circumstance and complete the documentation within 24 hours.

8/31/19

Failure to meet any of the agreed upon goals before the indicated follow-up date, will result in disciplinary action up to and including termination.

Professionalism – client reported employee was wearing flip flops and holey jeans. Per Recover Care Dress Code Guidelines: 


“As an employee of Recover Health, you present our image as an agency to our clients and vendors, your co-workers, and the general public. We expect our employees to dress in a professional and functional manner appropriate for their position and situation (clothing guidelines vary for some positions, depending

on job duties). Your personal appearance should be neat and show good personal hygiene. Hair,

including facial hair, should be worn in a conservative style. We expect employees to wear clean clothing that does not display offensive or prejudicial words or pictures.


Any employee who dresses inappropriately for work is subject to disciplinary action up to and including termination.”


We consider the following clothing inappropriate in all situations:

  • Apparel with tears, rips, or holes (whether designed or not)
  • For safety reasons, shoes are to be worn at all times. Proper shoes will help prevent slipping. When caring for clients, avoid open toes, open heels, flip-flops, platform, or smooth-soled shoes. Rubber-soled athletic shoes or sneakers work best in the home environment
  • Employee will wear close-toed shoes at all times, no exception. 
  • Employee will adhere to the Recover Care dress-code expectations
  • Employee will understand holey jeans are not acceptable nor professional

8/31/19

Failure to meet any of the agreed upon goals before the indicated follow-up date, will result in disciplinary action up to and including termination.